Books Bible

JPS Bible Commentary on Jonah Hardcover – August 1, 1999
by Dr. Uriel Simon
JPS Jonah

Prof. Simon’s new commentary on Jonah contains the complete Hebrew text, the JPS’s new English translation, and an extensive original commentary that illuminates the text like a 1000 watt searchlight. On average, each four or five lines of text gets a full page of explanation and commentary, so every subject gets covered in detail.
He makes use of traditional rabbinic commentaries, and the Mishna, Midrash and Talmud. But it doesn’t end here: The commentary goes on to make good use of literary analysis and comparative Semitics; intertextual commentary relating each book to other biblical books, and evidence from modern archaeological, discoveries.
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The JPS Torah Commentary, Jacob Milgrom, JPS
JPS Numbers

This contains the complete Hebrew text of Genesis, the JPS’s new English translation, and an extensive original commentary that illuminates the text like a 1000 watt searchlight. On average, each four or five lines of text gets a full page of explanation and commentary, so every subject gets covered in detail.

Like all the JPS Torah commentators, this work use of traditional rabbinic commentaries, and the Mishna, Midrash and Talmud. But it doesn’t end here: The commentary goes on to make good use of literary analysis and comparative Semitics; intertextual commentary relating each book to other biblical books, and evidence from modern archaeological, discoveries.
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The Contemporary Torah: A Gender-sensitive Adaptation of the JPS Translation Hardcover – August 1, 2006
by David E. S. Stein (Editor), Carol L. Meyers (Editor)

JPS The Contemporary Torah Gender Sensitive

This is a “gender-sensitive” version of the standard Jewish Publication Society (JPS) Tanakh. Normally I tune out whenever someone rewrites segments of the Torah or Siddur to be “gender sensitive” or “gender neutral”. When I have seen such approaches in liberal Jewish writings, I’ve often found rewriting of the Bible itself in order to serve current modern-day political correctness (which is short sighted, since the politically correct positions of today may not resonate with readers in the next few generations!)

However, once I read the introduction of this new work, I was heartened to find a responsible, academic approach to the issue. Instead of retranslating the Bible for promoting current social and political purposes, the emphasis here is on the peshat, translating the text as it was meant to be understood by the original audience. This is done in a way that the translator hopes will remove unconscious or misleading gender errors. In the introduction to this volume David Stein notes that the current JPS Torah and Tanakh (New JPS, or NJPS) already engaged, to some extent, in gender-accuracy and sensitivity. Stein writes:

“Where the Torah’s language suggested a neutral sense, NJPS avoided misleadingly ascribing gender, not only by rendering inclusively some “male” nouns, but also by rendering masculine inflections and pronouns idiomatically rather than literally. Thus, for example, what kjv had rendered as “thou shalt not wrest the judgment of thy poor in his cause” appears in NJPS as “you shall not subvert the rights of your needy in their disputes” (Exod. 23:6). In short, NJPS inadvertently led the way among contemporary translations in “gender-sensitive” rendering. Limitations of NJPS Despite its overall strengths, the gender ascriptions in NJPS can still be called into question on a number of counts….

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