Tag Archives: rum

Whiskey reviews page 7

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Useful articles on whiskey and Is all whiskey and Scotch kosher?

Hochstadter’s Slow & Low Rock and Rye

The Cooper Spirits Co., 84 Proof, No age statement.
Price? Cheap as heck, $20 for 750 ml. $12 for 375 ml.

A modern release of a classic American cocktail:

“Rock and Rye was once believed to be a cure-all for the common cold. So famous were the phlegm-fighting qualities of the drink in days gone by that children used to be given rock-and-rye-flavored cough drops at the first sign of hacking and whooping. Now the drink is being revived by bartenders who see it as a cure for the common cocktail…. Rock and Rye held on to its reputation as a cure-all well into the 20th century. No. 434 in “The American Credo,” George Jean Nathan and H.L. Mencken’s biting 1920 catalog of things Americans believed in, was “That rock-and-rye will cure a cold.” At a 1952 conference of the Common Cold Foundation, a prominent Johns Hopkins virologist, Dr. Thomas G. Ward, was asked what medicine could do against the stubborn rhinovirus. “Personally, my favorite treatment is old Maryland Rock and Rye,” he replied.
A Cocktail for What Ails You, Eric Felten, June 2009, Wall Street Journal

Made with: straight rye whiskey (a blend, based around a 6 year old), Pennsylvania honey, air-dried navel oranges from Florida, Angostura-style cocktail bitters, and rock candy.

Nose : honey, bitters (perhaps a hint of cloves?)

Palate: citrus, honey, bitters, and the rye is just beneath. Very sweet – but not “well aged whiskey with hints of barrel carmelization” sweet, but “we added some rock candy” sweet.

Best served over a lot of ice: this classic cocktail is a bit heavy on the flavors to drink straight. The ice cools and cuts it, to turn it into a pleasant, classic cocktail.  If you’re used to drinking regular (unflavored) whiskey, this might seem too flavored, but in that case just cut it 50-50 with a favorite whiskey, and it might then magically match your palate.

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Bowman Brothers Pioneer Spirit, Virginia Straight Bourbon Whiskey

A. Smith Bowman Distillery/Sazerac, made in Fredericksburg, Virginia.
90 proof, no age statement.  MSRP: $33, in NH for $29.99.

Bowman Brothers Virginia Bourbon

First, a bit of history from the company website:

John, Abraham, Joseph and Isaac Bowman were Virginia militia officers in the American Revolutionary War. In 1779, they led thirty pioneer families to Madison County, Kentucky and established Bowman’s Station. Later, the brothers helped establish and settle Fayette County. They were legends, admired and respected by fellow settlers for their courage and bravery. This hand-crafted bourbon whiskey is a tribute to these four heroic Bowman Brothers.”
A. Smith Bowman.com

Here’s a new one for you: A. Smith Bowman doesn’t make their own whiskey  yet they also are not a NDP.  Instead, they purchase whitedog – unaged whiskey distillate – from Buffalo Trace. Buffalo Trace makes the mash bill, ferments it, distills it twice, and then A. Smith Bowman gives it a 3rd distillation at their Virginia facility with an Irish style copper pot still. Bowman ages it in new, oak, charred barrels (reportedly 6 to 7 years, although I’m still trying to pin this down.) Easy enough for them to do, as both they and Buffalo Trace are owned by the same parent corporation (Sazerac.) Many reviewers say that this Buffalo Trace’s #2 mashbill, the one used for Elmer T. Lee and Blanton’s.

Nose – oak, floral,a hint of tobacco,

Palate -a beautiful round mouth-feel, although not quite as thick as Michter’s bourbon. Notes of toffee (or is that mocha?) and toasted oak. Drier than some of the relatively sweet bourbons that I generally enjoy, yet less dry than dry wines. This stands out as one of the better whiskeys that I have tried – and that says something. Normally I’m wowed by notes of toffee (Michter’s Bourbon) or if it’s finished in a wine cask, such as Angel’s Envy bourbon. Yet this is a straight, classic, oaky bourbon that I’m digging, which tastes miles away from Jack Daniels, Jim Beam. This is something special. Several people have noted that this tastes like the more famous Elmer T Lee (Buffalo Trace), but alas I haven’t had a chance to sample that bourbon yet.

For more details I can point you to this article on A. Smith Bowman and their whiskeys: American Whiskey, Yes, Virginia, there is a Gentleman, Linda and John Lipman

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Glendalough double barrel Irish whiskey

What do we know about the contents? They state ” distilled in a Coffey still from a mash bill of Irish malted barley and corn. It spends three and a half years in American oak first-fill Bourbon barrels before being finished for six months in Spanish Oloroso sherry casks. ” This is a new distillery, and as I understand they are using sourced whiskey for this product – which is perfectly fine. After coming out of the sherry casks, it is brought down to 42% ABV with local Wicklow Mountain water.

Sells for around $30, but one can find it on sale for cheaper.

Nose: fruit, floral – perhaps a hint of cherry.

Flavor: Moderately sweet, creamy, a hint of bourbon or toffee notes. This finished whiskey reminds me of Angel’s Envy Port finished bourbon – but that is $50, and I can find this for $22 to $28 in Massachusetts. This is an amazing value.

Glendalough Double Barrel Irish

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Russell’s Reserve 10 Year Bourbon

$30 in New Hampshire, from Wild Turkey Distillery

Aged 10 years in virgin American oak casks , #4 char.

Mash bill: Uncertain, but I’ve read 75% corn, 13% rye, and 12% barley.

Visited the Cheesecake Factory, and perused their whiskey list. Found Russell’s Reserve 10 Year Bourbon, which I’ve heard a lot of talk about over the past couple of months, so I thought that I’d give it a try. This is supposed to be a big step up from their baseline, “bottom shelf” Wild Turkey 81 Proof. That Wild Turkey was a favorite of Hunter S. Thompson, famed gonzo journalist.  So, how is the 10 year old?

Color: Deep caramel

Nose: A delicious experience, some vanilla, butterscotch, and pepper.

Palate: Rich mouthfeel. Delicious and warm on the front palate: molasses, oak, and then a bit of crisp green apple! But an astringent taste going back that almost overwhelmed the initial sensation. I drank this slowly, over a half hour , and the rough landing past the back palate was consistent: alcohol, pepper, something oddly organic. Definitely going to try this again sometime, but based on this first experience I’m not planning on a buying a bottle at this time.

Russell's Reserve 10 Year

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What are finished whiskies?

Finishing is the procedure that some whiskeys undergo whereby the spirit is matured in a cask of a particular origin and then spends time in a cask of different origin (generally 6 months to 2 years.) Typically, the first cask is an American oak cask formerly used to mature bourbon. The second cask may be one that has been used to mature some sort of fortified wine.

In the United States, finished whiskeys are legally classified as a Distilled Spirit Specialty, although that term doesn’t appear on whiskey bottle labels.  The formal definition is “any class and/or type of distilled spirits that contain or are treated with flavoring and/or coloring materials and/or nonstandard blending or treating materials or processes.”, in this case the flavoring simply being wine left in the wood of the second cask –  TTB (U.S. Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau)

There is a debate in some sectors of the whiskey world of whether a finished whiskey counts as a true/straight whiskey, or whether it is a flavored product. However, if one were to consider it a flavored product, then all Scotch would have to re-defined as flavored whiskey, because all Scotch is aged in already used in a barrel that has already held bourbon. (Bourbon, in contrast, may only be aged in new oak.)

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Jefferson’s Reserve Pritchard Hill Cabernet Cask Finished

90.2 Proof,  Finished in French Oak casks that had held Cabernet Sauvignon

I recently tried a terrific bourbon, Angel’s Envy, finished in port wine barrels, so I was very excited to see this finished bourbon available for tasting at a Total Wine location in Massachusetts. If Jefferson’s could also create something wonderful, then perhaps I’d have found two new favorites within a month (something which has not happened yet.)

The nose was gentle, a bit sweet, but that’s not always indicative of the taste. So let’s see…. and….. WINE?!  Yes, ladies and gentlemen, this finished whiskey didn’t taste much like a finished whiskey – it tasted more like the Cabernet Sauvignon itself. I do understand the appeal of this, for some people.  But to me, this didn’t taste like a whiskey – it tasted like a whiskey-wine cocktail, which just wasn’t what I was looking for.

Finishing, in of itself, is a useful technique. For example, Angel’s Envy did pick up some of the port wine flavor, but only subtly altered the whiskey, without overpowering it.  My advice to Jefferson’s would be to continue their experiments in finished whiskies, but cut the amount of finishing time in half. Finally, the price is ridiculous. Regular Jefferson’s Very Small Batch Bourbon is $31, but this was $70, an unjustifiable price for the few months of extra aging, even for someone who really did enjoy the result.

Jefferson's Reserve Pritchard Hill Cabernet.jpg

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West Cork Blended Irish Whiskey: Bourbon Cask

($22) 80 proof. No age statement (3+ years.) . 75% grain Irish whiskey & 25% malt Irish whiskey. Matured in first fill bourbon casks. Simple, straightforward, and yes, it developed some bourbon characteristics. Mild, spicy, hint of toffee note. I liked this!

West Cork Black Reserve (Limited Reserve)

86 proof.  No age statement (3+ years.) Aged in lightly toasted, charred #4 bourbon first fill casks. Color is golden amber.  Smoky but not peaty. More of a traditional Irish whiskey – which is great for other Irish whiskey fans – but I actually preferred the cheaper Bourbon Cask (above.)

West Cork Blended Irish Whiskey

124 proof. 33% malt and 66% grain whisky. Matured in ex-bourbon casks.  Oak brown color.  Too strong for tastes – I’d need to water this back down to 90 proof to make it drinkable. But hey, to each his own.

West Cork Irish Whiskey

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Is there a kosher for Pesach (פֶּסַח, Passover) whiskey? Until now the answer has been negative. In the Jewish faith, one does not drink whiskey on Passover, as whiskey is a grain product, and Passover rules forbid consuming any products made from chametz (חָמֵץ ) : chametz is any food product made from wheat, spelt, barley, and rye (*) that is either leavened – or even left moist long enough to theoretically become leavened on it’s own. But it now appears as if we have our first justifiably kosher for Passover whiskey, Platte Valley 100% Straight Corn Whiskey. (*) Most Ashkenazi rabbis also add oats to this list, but adding this grain is controversial.

Kosher for Passover Corn Whiskey

corn-whiskey-passover

Also see Jews and whiskey during prohibition

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A plethora of new Irish whiskey reviews!

Glendalough Poutin Sherry Cask; Glendalough Double Barrel; Glendalough Single Malt, aged 7 years; Glendalough Single Malt, aged 13 years; and Glendalough Poitin
Tullamore Dew Irish Whiskey-regular; Tullamore Dew Irish Whiskey- aged 12 years
Flaming Leprechaun Irish Whiskey; Jameson Irish Whiskey; and Jameson Caskmates; and Jameson Black Barrel; Bushmills Black Bush Irish Whiskey. Middleton Very Rare, Green Spot, Redbreast Aged 12 Years, Redbreast Lustau Edition, Power’s John Lane Release

Irish whiskey reviews

Glendalough

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Michter’s US*1 Small Batch Original Bourbon Whiskey

I’ve heard good things about Michter’s, but local restaurants didn’t have any on hand for me to sample. This motivated me to travel to Saloon, at Davis Square (Somerville, MA) modeled after a prohibition-era speakeasy.

It’s hard to spot – you have look for the doorway next to the Davis Square Theatre, which takes you downstairs. The “sign” is just the light in front. matthew-j-lee-boston-globe-staff

This pic by Matthew J. Lee/Globe Staff

Entering, I found myself back in time in a charming speakeasy, dark wood paneling, leather chairs, with a decent sized bar, and more cozy areas to sit at tables with friends.

The manager and bartender were knowledgeable and friendly, and they had well over 100 varieties of whiskey, rye, bourbon and scotch to sample.

saloon-somerville

Before reviewing it, let’s ask – what is Michter’s? The original Michter’s was made at Bomberger’s Distillery, from the 1950’s, until the 1980’s.  That original spirit is no longer available.  In the 1990’s Chatham Imports bought the name.

michters-at-saloon-somervilleChatham has begun distilling its own whiskey in Kentucky, but they haven’t released bourbon from their new distillery yet. So this Michter’s Small Batch has been sourced from some other major producer, making it an NDP product.

Chatham notes that they made an arrangement with a major, undisclosed, distillery in Kentucky to use to make their spirit for them, while Chatham was building it’s new distillery.  Chatham is currently aging large amount of it’s own whiskey and bourbon, which is not yet on the market.

However, they aren’t like other NDPs: Other NDPs just quietly buy some other companies whiskey and rebottle it, at a higher price. Chatham instead specified a mashbill and yeast strain, and had this whiskey made to to their specifications (Michter’s); they then aged it in their own warehouse, in air-dryed wood barrels, toasted as well as charred etc, and then bottled it. They state that the new bourbon they are distilling themselves has the same mash bill and yeast strain, and will age in the same type barrels, so they promise that their own new bourbon will eventually be the same as the one we are drinking today.

Their current US*1 bourbon is 91.4 proof. NAS (no age statement) but their website states that it is around 8 years old; it’s common to mention this on the website, but not the bottle, so as to have flexibility: it may contains blends of 6 year old, 7, 8 or older whiskies. The “small batch” is explained as being “typically composed of no more than two dozen barrels.”

Color: Amber. Nose: slightly dark, fruit. Taste:  Wow, this has a round mouth feel, full & flavorful. Thick body, caramel on the front palate. A bit sweet. Nothing floral or citrus like Four Roses, this is a totally different type of bourbon.  So full that it stands up to having a couple of ice cubes in it. Has a pleasantly long finish. This bourbon is a winner, and one I’ll soon be trying again.

Further reading: Michter’s Distillery Joe Magliocco Talks About Doubling Capacity to 1,000,000 Gallons and This Louisville distillery is doubling capacity — one year after opening

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Contents

Main page: Merrimack Valley Whiskey Blog
Rum reviews
Page 6 whiskey reviews
Page 5 Irish whiskey special
Page 4 whiskey reviews
Page 3 Flavored whiskies, other spirits
Page 2 whiskey reviews
Page 1 whiskey reviews
Useful articles on whiskey 
Is all whiskey and Scotch kosher? 

Drinking and health

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No doubt that it is safe for most people to drink small amounts of alcohol on a regular basis, and have moderate amounts of alcohol, more occasionally. But how much is a safe amount?

Alcoholism and other substance abuse issues certainly run in families, and people who know about this in their own family are wisely advised to avoid alcohol, or keenly monitor their drinking patterns. Some families have a history of certain diseases which alcohol can exacerbate, so the same caution is due here as well.  But what about people without high risk factors? For years medical studies have shown some small benefits of drinking wine, a few other studies showed small benefits from small amounts of any kind of alcohol. And we all know of family members or community members who had a drink every day, and lived well past 100.

For any person, too much alcohol at once can affect the brain, as such
(source of image unknown; corrections requested)

Alcohol and Brain

But a growing number of studies are showing that that for many people, there are increased health risks at lower levels of alcohol consumption that once thought. For instance:

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Moderate alcohol consumption as risk factor for adverse brain outcomes and cognitive decline: longitudinal cohort study

Moderate alcohol consumption as risk factor for adverse brain outcomes and cognitive decline, BMJ June 2017

Higher alcohol consumption over the 30 year follow-up was associated with increased odds of hippocampal atrophy in a dose dependent fashion. While those consuming over 30 units a week were at the highest risk compared with abstainers, even those drinking moderately (14-21 units/week) had three times the odds of right sided hippocampal atrophy. There was no protective effect of light drinking (1-<7 units/week) over abstinence. Higher alcohol use was also associated with differences in corpus callosum microstructure and faster decline in lexical fluency. No association was found with cross sectional cognitive performance or longitudinal changes in semantic fluency or word recall…. Alcohol consumption, even at moderate levels, is associated with adverse brain outcomes including hippocampal atrophy. These results support the recent reduction in alcohol guidance in the UK and question the current limits recommended in the US.

When reading such studies, we first ask, what is a “unit” of alcohol? In the UK we find this definition:

1 unit of alcohol = 10 millilitres (8 grams) of pure alcohol.

Typical drinks may contain 1–3 units of alcohol.

A ten ounce beer (300 ml) at 3.5% ABV contains about one unit;

A medium glass (175 ml) of 12% ABV wine has two units of alcohol

A small glass (50 ml) of sherry or port (20% ABV) contains about one unit.

Most whisky is 40% ABV.
In England, a single pub measure (25 ml) of whisky contains one unit.

A typical American miniature bottle is 50 ml -> 2 units.

A typical American pour at a bar is 2 ounces -> 60 ml -> 2.4 units

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Possible health benefits of moderate whiskey consumption

http://coolmaterial.com/food-drink/health-benefits-whiskey/

https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/alcohol-full-story/

moderate alcohol usage and increased antioxidant intake decrease the risk of coronary heart disease.

Odds of dementia are lower among adults who consumed moderate alcohol, rather than none at all

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“There are small amounts of sugar in all whiskies. Scottish whiskies have some sugars dissolved from the oak cask and often some from optional caramel colouring (E150a). Total amount of sugars is quite low, usually well below 1 g/l, but in certain cases it is quite possible to reach a few grams per liter. The sweet aromas of whisky matured in refill bourbon or new oak casks mostly come from sweet aromatic vanillin and fruity esters, not from the sugars. However, sugars can have a significant role in the case of casks previously used for sweet wine or sweetened spirit….”

Sugars in Whiskey: whiskyscience.blogspot.com

“Whiskey is among the most diet-friendly alcoholic drinks there is, at least in terms of a calorie-to-booze ratio. A one and a half ounce shot of 86 proof whiskey contains just 105 calories. One 12-ounce bottle of craft beer that contains about the same amount of alcohol? You’re looking at double the calories….”

How many calories are in whiskey? The Whiskey Wash

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Contents

Main page: Merrimack Valley Whiskey Blog
Rum reviews
Page 6 whiskey reviews
Page 5 Irish whiskey special
Page 4 whiskey reviews
Page 3 Flavored whiskies, other spirits
Page 2 whiskey reviews
Page 1 whiskey reviews
Useful articles on whiskey 
Is all whiskey and Scotch kosher? 

Rum reviews

Merrimack Valley Whiskey Review

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Welcome! My qualifications as a sommelier? I know what I like – and the science & pseudo-science of spirits tasting. Tools of the trade: a Glencairn (nosing glass designed for whisky) or the old fashioned rocks glass tumbler. I review any kind of rum, or whiskey: Single malt, Scotch, Bourbon, Rye, Irish, Canadian, etc.

Useful articles on whiskey and Is all whiskey and Scotch kosher?

ברוך אתה ה’ א‑לוהינו, מלך העולם, שהכל נהיה בדברו.

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Papa’s Pilar Dark 24

A rum inspired by the great American writer Ernest Hemingway; he a 12 m fishing boat named Pilar – which was a nickname for his wife, Pauline. This is a photo of Ernest Hemingway and Carlos Gutierrez aboard the Pilar in 1934.

Ernest Hemingway and Carlos Gutierrez aboard Pilar 1934

This rum was sourced from 5 different Caribbean and Central American distilleries (pot and column distillation) with 8 different ages. Brought to Florida, where it was fractionally Solara blended in Bourbon, Port and then Sherry casks. Some sugar was added, and the result is unlike any rum I have tasted before. Delicious notes of cocoa, maple and caramel.  Reminded me of a full flavored bourbon like Michter’s.

Papa's Pilar Dark

As for the curious shape of the bottle, the company states

“If the shape looks familiar, that’s because it’s styled after the aluminum canteens carried by US infantryman for most of the 20th Century. The bottle pays homage to Hemingway’s duty as an ambulance driver in Italy during World War I and his exposure to the Normandy landings in World War II. Why the chain? US infantry canteens used a chain to tether the screw cap to the bottle. The cap could be left slightly loose on the march – allowing drops of water to slosh out and soak the canvas covering. Evaporation kept the contents cool. Last but not least, etched into Pilar’s bottle cap is a compass – the simple yet indispensable tool that provides comfort and direction to adventurers on land and sea. The compass on Pilar Dark’s cap has the African Sun logo in its center, signifying Hemingway’s adventures on land.”

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La Caña Grande Gold Rum

Supposedly distilled in the Caribbean Rum, Barbados. Appears to be a Total Wines house brand; can’t find it sold anywhere else. 80 Proof

Nose. They say “Mild aromas of caramel cream.” I detect ethanol.

Palette – well, better than the disappointing nose. The body is thin, watery, a bit of meaningful authentic rum taste for sure, a dash of pepper, in a slight sweetness. No bitter aftertaste. I could see someone purchasing this for use as a cheap mixer. But nothing special worth drinking straight. Tasted like it could rum flavored vodka. Just meh.

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Myers’s Rum

First made in 1879. A of up to 9 Jamaican rums, in small oak barrels for a number of years. Made by National Rums of Jamaica and Myers Rum Company in Nassau, Bahamas.

Oh my goodness, my first thought is that they put Coal tar in here? This is foul smelling.   I’m trying to detect something pleasant in the nose, but it makes me gag. Never experienced anything like this in a spirit before. But in for a penny, in for a pound – let’s taste this. And…. my adventuresome spirit has been richly rewarded by the taste of asphalt and perhaps shoe rubber. Honestly this is the first spirit that has made me gag. But wait, I’m a newbie to this. Had some water, waited, tried again – but it never got better.

What do other people experience? On his review, the cocktail geeks says that those has “aromas of stewed prunes, manure, apples, plump raisins, butter toffee.” – whoah – manure?!  Ok, it’s not just me.  But then I saw other reviews,

From what I have read it is “supposed to taste like this” as it is used in some exotic cocktails. But that doesn’t save it for me. Verdict? Requires an exorcism.

Mount Gay Barbados Rum Black Barrel

Small-batch handcrafted rum. Est. 1703. 86 proof.

A blend of double distilled pot and single column distilled rums, finished in an ex-bourbon barrel.

Sweet nose and a hint of caramel, rich and promising – but wait, what is this funky additional note? I can’t name it, but I’ve read that this is characteristic of some Jamaican rums – although this is from Barbados. You can taste the molasses and spice, in some ways perhaps like a light whiskey. The finish is slightly astringent, but not unpleasantly so.  Maybe something like anise?  I admit that I’m disappointed not to pick up any bourbon notes. As a whiskey drinker, this isn’t something that I would enjoy straight, but it would be nice in a cocktail.

Gosling’s black seal Bermuda black rum.

80 proof. Product of Bermuda.

Beautiful dark amber color. A rich rum nose. Dark and complex. Upon tasting there are some pleasant caramel notes, but it’s a bit harsh and astringent, I’m getting more ethanol and bite then I would like. The finish is unfortunately a bit unpleasant..

Doorly’s XO Fine Old Barbados Rum

40 proof.

Aged in Oak barrels, followed by a second aging in barrels that formerly held Spanish Oloroso Sherry. A light amber color. The nose is pleasant but very mild. I actually got a bit more ethanol then flavor. Now, here’s the good part – the taste exceeds the nose. The flavors are warm, bright, gentle – you can drink this straight with ice, or use as an excellent quality mixer.  I’m actually shocked at how good this is. Until recently this was sold for around $33 in the USA, but apparently do to various trade incentives, the American price dropped to just $17/bottle, sold at Total Wine. This is an amazing value.

Coconut Jack rum

Produced by White Rock Distilleries – but “produced” does not mean distilled. Where is it from? USA, or Carribean? No idea. What kind of still was used? No information available. What we can say is that it is obviously adulterated with artificial coconut flavors and sugar (if it had had natural coconut flavors then they would have said so) I couldn’t find any information about the added sugar content. How to review something like this? There is no pretension of this being a fine rum, nor was it intended as something to sip straight. This is made cheaply to be used for cocktails. Goes well with Coca Cola, pineapple juice, or Cran-raspberry. Great for parties, especially given it’s cheap price point. Yet when sipped straight or on the rocks? Nope. Too sweet – all coconut and sweetness, very little actual rum flavor.

Rum reviews Dooley Goslings Myers's Mount Gay

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I was reading about adulterated rums. Although they are supposed to be an analog of whiskey, many have a lot of added sugar. Just read about one which has 30 grams per liter. But it’s not disclosed on the label.

Even Papa’s Pilar 24 Dark Rum has only 15 g/liter. ( that’s a favorite of mine.) If I understand correctly, for comparison, Coca-Cola has about 95 grams of sugar per liter.

So if we drink a 50 ml serving of Papa’s Pilar, that translates to less than 1 gram of sugar. That’s cool – but also about the max I would want in a rum.

Too much sugar is a big reason why I don’t drink cocktails anymore. They’re often huge amounts of sugar, glycerin, and artificial flavorings and colors , disguising low quality grain neutral spirits.

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Contents

Main page: Merrimack Valley Whiskey Blog
Rum reviews
Page 6 whiskey reviews
Page 5 Irish whiskey special
Page 4 whiskey reviews
Page 3 Flavored whiskies, other spirits
Page 2 whiskey reviews
Page 1 whiskey reviews
Useful articles on whiskey
Is all whiskey and Scotch kosher?

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