Sephardic Judaism

Introduction adapted from Wikipedia

Sephardi Jews , יהדות ספרד‬ (Yahadut Sefarad)

Sephardim ( סְפָרַדִּים‬, Modern Hebrew: Sefaraddim. Also יְהוּדֵי סְפָרַד‬ Ye’hude Sepharad, lit. “The Jews of Spain”),

migrations and settlements of the spanish jews
Image from Encyclopaedia Judaica

Population: 2,200,000, up to 16% of world Jewish population

Regions with significant populations, Israel 1.4 million. France 300,000–400,000. United States 200,000–300,000. Argentina 50,000. Brazil 40,000. Spain 40,000
Canada 30,000. Turkey 26,000. Italy 24,930. Mexico 15,000. United Kingdom 8,000

Originally from Sepharad, Spain or the Iberian peninsula. A Jewish ethnic division. They established communities throughout areas of modern Spain and Portugal, where they traditionally resided, evolving what would become their distinctive characteristics and diasporic identity, which they took with them in their exile from Iberia beginning in the late 15th century to North Africa, Anatolia, the Levant, Southeastern and Southern Europe, as well as the Americas, and all other places of their exiled settlement, either alongside pre-existing co-religionists, or alone as the first Jews in new frontiers.

More broadly, the term Sephardim has today also come sometimes to refer to traditionally Eastern Jewish communities of West Asia and beyond who, although not having genealogical roots in the Jewish communities of Iberia, have adopted a Sephardic style of liturgy and Sephardic law and customs imparted to them by the Iberian Jewish exiles over the course of the last few centuries.

Also see

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maghrebi_Jews

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mizrahi_Jews

Our articles

Sephardic Selichot customs

Thoughts about the Golden Age of Jewish Life in Spain

Sephardic Jewish views in the modern era

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